A hearty welcome back to Stupidly Simple Snacks with Amy Cao. If you’ve never watched one of Amy’s videos, check out the new one. To enjoy the revived series you need be neither stupid nor simple, but you should probably like snacks…
amyblogschow:

Stupidly Simple Snacks is back.
After eight months, Stupidly Simple Snacks is back in action with new episodes airing weekly. (Watch the new episode here.)
Huge thanks to my friends Hannah and Oleg of Schnitzel & Things for showing me how to make matzo brei. Matzo brei is a traditional Jewish breakfast and snack dish that’s especially popular during Passover. Learn more about Schnitzel & Things on their website and say hi on Twitter!
As many of you know, I began working with Foodspotting earlier this year, so I decided to devote my time learning the ropes and put SSS on hold for bit. I wouldn’t trade my team or job for the world, but I’m also mighty pleased to bring back snack-making! Please enjoy, and subscribe on YouTube so you don’t miss a thing ♥

A hearty welcome back to Stupidly Simple Snacks with Amy Cao. If you’ve never watched one of Amy’s videos, check out the new one. To enjoy the revived series you need be neither stupid nor simple, but you should probably like snacks…

amyblogschow:

Stupidly Simple Snacks is back.

After eight months, Stupidly Simple Snacks is back in action with new episodes airing weekly. (Watch the new episode here.)

Huge thanks to my friends Hannah and Oleg of Schnitzel & Things for showing me how to make matzo brei. Matzo brei is a traditional Jewish breakfast and snack dish that’s especially popular during Passover. Learn more about Schnitzel & Things on their website and say hi on Twitter!

As many of you know, I began working with Foodspotting earlier this year, so I decided to devote my time learning the ropes and put SSS on hold for bit. I wouldn’t trade my team or job for the world, but I’m also mighty pleased to bring back snack-making! Please enjoy, and subscribe on YouTube so you don’t miss a thing 

Here’s Laura’s update from Nathan’s!
lauraleu:

Today I competed in the Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Competition, and this was my view from the stage. I ate 8.5 dogs and finished 3rd…to last.
Backstory.

Here’s Laura’s update from Nathan’s!

lauraleu:

Today I competed in the Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Competition, and this was my view from the stage. I ate 8.5 dogs and finished 3rd…to last.

Backstory.

On Monday, I’ll be competing in the Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Competition. As you can see, becoming a competitive eater has not been pretty. Check out the essay I wrote for Salon on my journey from eating enthusiast to Bunnette to professional gorger. 
And you can see more of my ugly eating faces tomorrow at 11:25 AM (EST) on ESPN3.com, which is streaming live video of the first-ever women’s division. They’ll also be showing highlights from the ladies’ contest during the noon hour on ESPN. I’ll do my best to suppress my gag reflex.

On Monday, I’ll be competing in the Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Competition. As you can see, becoming a competitive eater has not been pretty. Check out the essay I wrote for Salon on my journey from eating enthusiast to Bunnette to professional gorger. 

And you can see more of my ugly eating faces tomorrow at 11:25 AM (EST) on ESPN3.com, which is streaming live video of the first-ever women’s division. They’ll also be showing highlights from the ladies’ contest during the noon hour on ESPN. I’ll do my best to suppress my gag reflex.

We’re giving away Candwiches! More info at the end of this post.ADAM: Usually this blog charts our mission to eat a meal from every nation in  the world without leaving New York City. But for this post we’re taking  a slight detour to eat a meal that we’re pretty sure comes from the  future. Or, if you’d prefer to believe the shipping label: West Jordan,  Utah. We’re talking, of course, about Candwich, the famed Sandwich in a  Can, which got the interwebs all abuzz when it was announced last year. Well, that meal tube is finally on sale. And always eager to try a  product whose packaging can simultaneously boast both “Extended Shelf  Life!” and also “Great for School Lunch!” we had a four-pack delivered  to our door. LAURA: The pull-tab opened with a “pop,” as if you were opening a can of  tennis balls and not, say, lunch. We were disappointed to see that the  sandwich was not pre-made. You get the bread, a knife and squeeze packs  of PB and J. For a “convenient” lunch option, this sandwich is  exhausting! On the plus side, it also came with a ready-to-eat Laffy  Taffy and a packet of FreshPax which helps it stay shelf-stable for over  a year. Mmmm, chemical drying agents…

ADAM: And instead of getting normal slices of bread, you get what is  essentially a hot dog bun. The bun is heavy and moist in a slightly  disturbing way, but its most noticeable characteristic is its odor.  Think of the smell of a WonderBread bun, then times it by roughly a  bajallion. That’s what Candwich bread smells like.
LAURA: Once inside our mouths, the peanut butter  and jelly tasted fine, but  the bread was unnaturally moist and frankly  gave me the heebies-jeebies  chewing it. Maybe my palate was just too  refined, though, because the  packaging claims that “Kids love them!”  Then again, kids also love  eating paste and boogers.ADAM: There’s way too much bread for the amount of peanut butter and jelly,  and the whole thing quickly condenses into an unpleasant wad in your  mouth. Basically, this is a canned good, except without the “good” part. That  being said, if I was stranded in a bomb shelter and all the other food  in the world was tainted with radioactive fallout? Sure, I’d eat it. Is  that a quote they might want to put on their packaging? BONUS:  We’re giving away our excess Candwiches! To win one, just reblog this  post on Tumblr and/or go to our Facebook page and “like” the link to  this article. We’ll randomly choose two winners and mail them their  shelf-stable prize/punishment.And for more food hilarity, kindly check out our other website I Want You Inside Me.

We’re giving away Candwiches! More info at the end of this post.

ADAM: Usually this blog charts our mission to eat a meal from every nation in the world without leaving New York City. But for this post we’re taking a slight detour to eat a meal that we’re pretty sure comes from the future. Or, if you’d prefer to believe the shipping label: West Jordan, Utah. We’re talking, of course, about Candwich, the famed Sandwich in a Can, which got the interwebs all abuzz when it was announced last year. Well, that meal tube is finally on sale. And always eager to try a product whose packaging can simultaneously boast both “Extended Shelf Life!” and also “Great for School Lunch!” we had a four-pack delivered to our door.

LAURA: The pull-tab opened with a “pop,” as if you were opening a can of tennis balls and not, say, lunch. We were disappointed to see that the sandwich was not pre-made. You get the bread, a knife and squeeze packs of PB and J. For a “convenient” lunch option, this sandwich is exhausting! On the plus side, it also came with a ready-to-eat Laffy Taffy and a packet of FreshPax which helps it stay shelf-stable for over a year. Mmmm, chemical drying agents…

ADAM: And instead of getting normal slices of bread, you get what is essentially a hot dog bun. The bun is heavy and moist in a slightly disturbing way, but its most noticeable characteristic is its odor. Think of the smell of a WonderBread bun, then times it by roughly a bajallion. That’s what Candwich bread smells like.

LAURA: Once inside our mouths, the peanut butter and jelly tasted fine, but the bread was unnaturally moist and frankly gave me the heebies-jeebies chewing it. Maybe my palate was just too refined, though, because the packaging claims that “Kids love them!” Then again, kids also love eating paste and boogers.Candwich Contents
ADAM: There’s way too much bread for the amount of peanut butter and jelly, and the whole thing quickly condenses into an unpleasant wad in your mouth. Basically, this is a canned good, except without the “good” part. That being said, if I was stranded in a bomb shelter and all the other food in the world was tainted with radioactive fallout? Sure, I’d eat it. Is that a quote they might want to put on their packaging?

BONUS: We’re giving away our excess Candwiches! To win one, just reblog this post on Tumblr and/or go to our Facebook page and “like” the link to this article. We’ll randomly choose two winners and mail them their shelf-stable prize/punishment.

And for more food hilarity, kindly check out our other website I Want You Inside Me.

Hey everybody! We’re working on some more Navigeating, but in the meantime, we wanted to share another food blog we started called I Want You Inside Me. The site is pretty simple: We take a shot of delicious food and then scrawl words on it. (As lovingly illustrated above.) It’s kind of like a culinary Perez Hilton. Except we won’t be drawing penises on pictures of ham sandwiches.
Yet.
Check it out at IWYIM.com.

Hey everybody! We’re working on some more Navigeating, but in the meantime, we wanted to share another food blog we started called I Want You Inside Me. The site is pretty simple: We take a shot of delicious food and then scrawl words on it. (As lovingly illustrated above.) It’s kind of like a culinary Perez Hilton. Except we won’t be drawing penises on pictures of ham sandwiches.

Yet.

Check it out at IWYIM.com.

Turkey via Ft. Greene, Brooklyn: The Country Makes A House Call

LAURA: Let’s talk Turkey. You know a country that shares its name with a delicious game bird is going to deliver on the yum tip. Speaking of delivering, SeamlessWeb hooked us up with a meal that was brought straight to our doorstep from Deniz Restaurant in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. They serve some of our favorite food: the kind that caters to lazy asses.

ADAM: We started with a dish of rolled phyllo dough stuffed with spinach and feta cheese. It’s called Sigara Boregi, aka “cigar” Boregi—so named for the way the dish gives you lung cancer. Or possibly just for the way it looks like a cigar. Stuffed pastries are an ancient and popular part of Turkish cuisine. Our Sigara Boregi were a little light on the stuffing and heavy on the pastry, but it’s hard to complain too loudly about any problem that centers around having too much fried dough.

LAURA: We ate more stuffed dough in the form of manti, or steamed Turkish dumplings. Ours were filled with lamb and onions and swam in a sea of garlic yogurt, which I thought was a bit too heavy on the oil and Adam thought was a bit too heavy on the meh. But they can’t be that bad since they’ve been around since the 13th century. When migrating Turks crossed Asia on horseback, they carried frozen or dried manti with them and boiled them over a campfire. Much like today, when a delivery man on a bicycle carried them across Flatbush Avenue.


ADAM: Next up was an Adana Kebab, a long sheath of minced lamb meat, tail fat and red bell peppers, which, when cooked up, looks disturbingly turd-like. Thankfully, it tastes significantly better than a turd. (Although in fairness, I’ve never actually tasted a turd, so I could possibly be underestimating it.) Anyway, to create the kebab, the minced meat is molded around a large metal skewer and then cooked over hot coals. This harkens back to the way kebabs were reputedly invented—Persian soldiers would used their swords to grill meat over open fires. To serve an Adana Kebab, the molded meat is slid off the skewer like a used condom. Scrumptious.


LAURA: The kebabs came with pide, a flat bread that was as big as a frisbee and unfortunately, just as difficult to bite into. Turks are pretty gung-ho about their bread. Back when the country was part of the Ottoman Empire, bakers believed that Adam (first guy on Earth, not the guy writing this) learned how to make bread from the Archangel Gabriel after he was booted from the Garden of Eden. What a silver lining! At any rate, Turks take such pride in their baking that the region Anatolia is known as the “Breadbasket of the World,” edging out Ukraine’s paltry “Breadbasket of Europe” nickname. Poor Ukraine. Now all it has going for it is meat jell-o.


ADAM: For dessert, we tore into some Kunefe, a pastry made of super-fine threads of dough and a cheesy-middle. The bready threads are made by drizzling a super-thin stream of batter onto a turning hotplate, then gathering the strands together so they resemble a pancake of shredded wheat. It all had a lightly sweet, honey-tinged taste that was surprisingly satisfying. It was only after the meal that we realized we should have taken the food into our living room, where we could have eaten Ottoman on our Ottoman. What fools! But it was a great meal anyway. Thanks for the free grub SeamlessWeb!


Eats Deets
Deniz Restaurant
662 Fulton Street (Fort Greene, Brooklyn)
718-852-6503

Happy Valentine’s Day! Instead of chocolates, we got you these fungus-encrusted worm corpses. And they say romance is dead.
Adding to our list of Chinese Aphrodisiacs, the Cordyceps Sinesis, or Caterpillar Fungus, is a parasitic mushroom that kills moth larvae and uses their carcasses to grow its spindly fungus body. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Cordyceps are used to treat impotence and waning libido. In fact, in a clinical trial of 243 men and woman who suffered from low sexual desire, 64% of those who ate the mummified bug mushroom  experienced a boost in horniness. Apparently, the sac fungus stimulates the secretion of testosterone and relaxes the corpus cavernosum of the penis (the smooth muscle), allowing blood to enter and produce what is clinically known as a RAGING BONER.
The crusty little buggers can be brewed in tea, stirred into soup or ground up and sprinkled on cereal. Kamwo Herbal Pharmacy (where we bought our deer antler) sells it for $800 per 38 grams. So it may be more expensive than a bouquet of roses, but when you care enough to say “I wanna bang you all night long, baby,” caterpillar fungus is the Valentine’s gift that truly keeps on giving (in bed).
Previously: Watch us test out other Chinese aphrodisiacs.

Happy Valentine’s Day! Instead of chocolates, we got you these fungus-encrusted worm corpses. And they say romance is dead.

Adding to our list of Chinese Aphrodisiacs, the Cordyceps Sinesis, or Caterpillar Fungus, is a parasitic mushroom that kills moth larvae and uses their carcasses to grow its spindly fungus body. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Cordyceps are used to treat impotence and waning libido. In fact, in a clinical trial of 243 men and woman who suffered from low sexual desire, 64% of those who ate the mummified bug mushroom experienced a boost in horniness. Apparently, the sac fungus stimulates the secretion of testosterone and relaxes the corpus cavernosum of the penis (the smooth muscle), allowing blood to enter and produce what is clinically known as a RAGING BONER.

The crusty little buggers can be brewed in tea, stirred into soup or ground up and sprinkled on cereal. Kamwo Herbal Pharmacy (where we bought our deer antler) sells it for $800 per 38 grams. So it may be more expensive than a bouquet of roses, but when you care enough to say “I wanna bang you all night long, baby,” caterpillar fungus is the Valentine’s gift that truly keeps on giving (in bed).

Previously: Watch us test out other Chinese aphrodisiacs.

For Valentine’s Day, we tested out some Chinese aphrodisiacs: Deer Antler, Shark Fin Soup and Bird’s Nest Soup. You figure they’ve got to at least kinda work—how else did China end up with so many people?

That’s a pic of me and Laura with a giant McRib! Backstory: A couple years ago, I wrote an article for Maxim that involved me seeking out McDonald’s restaurants that served the legendary, yet rarely-seen McRib. (It’s kind of like the Sasquatch of sandwiches.) Because of that road trip, Micky D’s invited me to Tuesday’s nationwide McRib relaunch event, where they were honoring a few dedicated McRib super fans. Yes, the event was great, but at the same time it was a little bit sad because it meant my life had just peaked.So in honor of the honors, here are some little-known McRib facts that I learned while doing my McResearch:1. The McRib was created by McDonald’s first head chef, Rene Arend. Admittedly, Arend’s largest contribution to McHistory would have to be the invention of the Chicken McNugget. When the McNugget debuted in 1979, demand was so high that McDonald’s couldn’t get enough chicken to supply all its franchises. So Arend had to create another menu item for restaurants who couldn’t get poultry. His creation? The McRib.2. Despite being called the McRib, the sandwich actually contains little rib meat and is made primarily from pork shoulder.3. When coming up with the sauce, the team began by tasting tons of store-bought barbecue sauces. They ended up patterning the McRib sauce off of KC Masterpiece.4. When first creating the sandwich, Arend faced internal pressure to mold the meat into a standard round patty. It is only through his genius and his perseverance that the McRib looks like it has rib bones. Even though it obviously has no rib bones. God bless him.OK, that’s all I got on McRib. If you still want to hear more about eating meat, may I suggest you try the video where Laura and I went zombie and ate a bunch of animal brains?

That’s a pic of me and Laura with a giant McRib! Backstory: A couple years ago, I wrote an article for Maxim that involved me seeking out McDonald’s restaurants that served the legendary, yet rarely-seen McRib. (It’s kind of like the Sasquatch of sandwiches.) Because of that road trip, Micky D’s invited me to Tuesday’s nationwide McRib relaunch event, where they were honoring a few dedicated McRib super fans. Yes, the event was great, but at the same time it was a little bit sad because it meant my life had just peaked.

So in honor of the honors, here are some little-known McRib facts that I learned while doing my McResearch:

1. The McRib was created by McDonald’s first head chef, Rene Arend. Admittedly, Arend’s largest contribution to McHistory would have to be the invention of the Chicken McNugget. When the McNugget debuted in 1979, demand was so high that McDonald’s couldn’t get enough chicken to supply all its franchises. So Arend had to create another menu item for restaurants who couldn’t get poultry. His creation? The McRib.

2. Despite being called the McRib, the sandwich actually contains little rib meat and is made primarily from pork shoulder.

3. When coming up with the sauce, the team began by tasting tons of store-bought barbecue sauces. They ended up patterning the McRib sauce off of KC Masterpiece.

4. When first creating the sandwich, Arend faced internal pressure to mold the meat into a standard round patty. It is only through his genius and his perseverance that the McRib looks like it has rib bones. Even though it obviously has no rib bones. God bless him.

OK, that’s all I got on McRib. If you still want to hear more about eating meat, may I suggest you try the video where Laura and I went zombie and ate a bunch of animal brains?

A Zombie’s Food Guide: Where to Eat Brains in NYC 
Want to fine dine like a zombie? As we were researching our brain-munching Halloween video, we discovered these New York restaurants that serve up cerebrums:Sautéed Calf’s Brains (Pictured above) At Chez Napoleon in midtown, we really enjoyed the classic French dish cervelle de veau—which is just a fancy way of saying cow brains sautéed in a ton of butter. If Julia Child rose from the dead, this is how she’d cook your brain.Barbecued Pig Brains On Sundays, they barbecue up a whole hog at Fatty ‘Cue in Williamsburg. Call ahead and they’ll save you the head. Added bonus: In addition to brains, you get eyeballs and face meat!Roasted Lamb Brain They don’t list it on the menu, but the Greek restaurant Uncle George’s in Astoria roasts whole lambs heads. The Greeks consider it a delicacy. We considered a stomach pump.Cow Brain Sandwich Put your brains on bread at Karam in Bay Ridge. Expert tip: Squirt on ketchup to make it look bloody!Fried Cow Brains St. Anselm in Williamsburg fries up cow noggins like they’re McNuggets, complete with a tasty dipping sauce. This is how Ronald McDonald will eat your brain.Enough talking about eating brains, time to watch it happen! Check out our video of us munching grey matter. We promise it’s just as funny as it is repulsive… 

A Zombie’s Food Guide: Where to Eat Brains in NYC

Want to fine dine like a zombie? As we were researching our brain-munching Halloween video, we discovered these New York restaurants that serve up cerebrums:

Sautéed Calf’s Brains
(Pictured above) At Chez Napoleon in midtown, we really enjoyed the classic French dish cervelle de veau—which is just a fancy way of saying cow brains sautéed in a ton of butter. If Julia Child rose from the dead, this is how she’d cook your brain.

Barbecued Pig Brains
On Sundays, they barbecue up a whole hog at Fatty ‘Cue in Williamsburg. Call ahead and they’ll save you the head. Added bonus: In addition to brains, you get eyeballs and face meat!

Roasted Lamb Brain
They don’t list it on the menu, but the Greek restaurant Uncle George’s in Astoria roasts whole lambs heads. The Greeks consider it a delicacy. We considered a stomach pump.

Cow Brain Sandwich
Put your brains on bread at Karam in Bay Ridge. Expert tip: Squirt on ketchup to make it look bloody!

Fried Cow
Brains St. Anselm in Williamsburg fries up cow noggins like they’re McNuggets, complete with a tasty dipping sauce. This is how Ronald McDonald will eat your brain.

Enough talking about eating brains, time to watch it happen! Check out our video of us munching grey matter. We promise it’s just as funny as it is repulsive…